Storage

POV: Power Breakfast

Power Breakfast for Apr. 20, 2016

U.S. Senate passes energy bill; Dyson to invest £1 billion in battery technology


POV: Power Breakfast

A nearly daily update of energy-related news:

  • This morning, the U.S. Senate passed a wide-ranging bill (by 85-12) to modernize the country’s energy policy. The bill attempts to modernize the power grid, spur innovations in energy storage and speed the permitting process for LNG exports. It is the first energy bill in the Senate to be passed in nine years.
  • Dyson Ltd, a British technology company that designs and manufactures vacuum cleaners, hand dryers, bladeless fans, and heaters, plans to invest £1 billion in battery technology over the next five years. This news follows the announcement made in October 2015 when the company acquired a solid-state battery company, Sakti3, for $90 million. The battery will be used in the company’s electric vehicle which it is said to be developing.
POV: Power Breakfast

Power Breakfast for Apr. 19, 2016

The Tesla Gigafactory to provide 35 GWh of energy storage; India's Energy Minister says solar is cheaper than coal


POV: Power Breakfast

A nearly daily update of energy-related news:

  • The Tesla Gigafactory outside of Reno, Nevada, which will manufacture batteries for Tesla’s electric cars, is forecasted to produce 35 GWh of energy storage a year for its vehicles. As reported on NPR, the factory has an estimated cost of $5 billion and will stand at 5.8 million square feet, roughly 100 football fields. To date, only 14 percent of the factory has been built. The factory will also manufacture larger versions of the Powerpacks for energy storage at factories, industrial sites and electric utilities.
  • While speaking about India’s action plan for renewables, the country’s Energy Minister, Piyush Goyal, said that solar energy is now cheaper than coal. He sates, “Of course there are challenges of 24/7 power. We accept all of that – but we have been able to come up with a solar-based long term vision that is not subsidy based.” India is on track to deploy more than 100 GW of solar power by 2022, beating its own goal for solar energy.
POV: Power Breakfast

Power Breakfast for Apr. 14, 2016

Wind, natural gas and solar made up 97 percent of all new electric generation capacity; Solar provided the U.K. with more power than coal; Energy storage set to rise


POV: Power Breakfast

A nearly daily update of energy-related news:

  • The EIA reports that wind, natural gas and solar made up 97 percent of all new electric generation capacity in 2015, accounting for 41 percent, 30 percent and 26 percent of total additions (respectively). The state of Texas added the most wind capacity at 42 percent of total U.S. wind additions. In 2015, California added more than 1,000 MW of utility-scale solar and 1,000 MW of distributed solar PV capacity. This accounted for 42 percent of overall solar additions.
  • Last weekend, solar power provided the U.K.  with more power than coal-fired power stations for 24 hours. The National Grid showed that 29 GWh of solar power was generated last Saturday versus 21 GWh of power from coal.
  • A study the research group EuPD found that only 34 percent of PV installers offer energy storage solutions to their customers.  However, 26 percent of the installers that currently do not offer solutions hope to begin in 2016. Additionally, 38 percent of the installers that do not offer solutions say that current battery prices prevent them from offering this service.
POV: Power Breakfast

Power Breakfast for Apr. 6, 2016

Solar to grow by 521 percent in Mexico; World’s largest lithium NMC oxide battery system deployed in South Korea


POV: Power Breakfast

A nearly daily update of energy-related news:

  • During Mexico’s first-ever power auction, 11 PV projects were awarded contracts worth four million MWhs per year (translating to 1,860 MWs of capacity). Out of a total 5.38 million MWhs of energy awarded at the auction, PV won 74 percent with wind winning the other 26 percent. Solar in Mexico is now set to grow by 521 percent during this year.
  • The world’s largest lithium-nickel-manganese-cobalt (NMC) oxide battery system has been deployed in South Korea due to a growing demand for grid-scale storage in the country. The 24 MW, 9 MWh system was installed in January of this year. The South Korean energy storage market has been growing of a rate of approximately 200 percent annually for the past three years.
POV: Power Breakfast

Power Breakfast for Apr. 5, 2016

A 10 MW energy storage facility to be built in central Texas; Scotland beat its goal of 50 percent of electricity from renewable sources


POV: Power Breakfast

A nearly daily update of energy-related news:

  • A 10 MW energy storage facility is being built just north of Austin, Texas, in Williamson County. This energy storage facility will be built from racks of lithium ion batteries inside of climate-controlled shipping containers to store energy generated during the day by wind and/or solar electricity sources. Alevo Group and Ormat Technologies will own and operate the facility.
  • The U.K. Department of Energy and Climate Change reported that Scotland generated 57.7 percent of its electricity from renewable sources in 2015, beating its target of 50 percent of electricity from renewable sources. In 2015, Scotland’s renewable electricity generation increased by almost 16 percent from the previous year.
POV: Power Breakfast

Power Breakfast for Mar. 29, 2016

UTSA professor awarded grant to study cybersecurity for the electrical grid; Solar in Japan set to peak in 2016


POV: Power Breakfast

A nearly daily update of energy-related news:

  • An assistant professor at The University of Texas at San Antonio, Ahmad Taha, has been awarded a $30,000 grant to study the cybersecurity of the U.S. electrical grid. His work will focus on smart grids and the Internet-enabled devices that generate and monitor electric power in the U.S. “A smart grid is the future version of the electrical grid that enables more renewable energy sources (to be connected), and allows consumers to control their demand. But it’s also for power generators to know exactly how much power they should be creating. It’s more dynamic and real-time,” said Taha.
  • Aided by governmental incentives, new installations of rooftop solar in Japan are set to peak at 14 GWs in 2016. The government seeks to have seven percent of the country’s electricity generated from photovoltaics by 2030, which will require 64 GWs of capacity according to 2015 figures. However, these incentives will soon expire which may result in a reduction of new installations.
POV: Power Breakfast

Power Breakfast for Mar. 22, 2016

Dyson to spend $1.4 billion on battery storage; EIA reports 197 million tons of coal accumulated at the end of 2015; Puerto Rico working with battery company for solar facility


POV: Power Breakfast

A nearly daily update of energy-related news:

  • Dyson Ltd., the U.K. vacuum cleaner producer, will spend $1.4 billion on battery development over the next five years as it expands into new sectors. Dyson has recently been awarded a £16 million grant from the British government to spend on researching longer-lasting batteries. Investment into batteries is not new for Dyson as it acquired a U.S. solid-state lithium-ion battery manufacturer for $90 million named Satki3 in 2015.
  • The EIA reports that there were 197 million tons of coal accumulated at the end of 2015, the highest year-end level in at least 25 years. Analysts attribute this to a decline in the demand for coal due to a warmer winter and to a shift away from this resource as a power source.
  • In order to meet a 20 percent renewable mandate by 2035, Puerto Rico’s electric utility (PREPA) is working with Saft to supply lithium-ion battery storage to a 10 MW solar facility on the island. “In remote locations and islands, it is essential our batteries can handle substantial daily energy flows and high power outputs in order to stabilize solar farms. Enabling Puerto Rico to generate solar energy domestically not only addresses RPS goals, but also adds local jobs,” says Jim McDowall, Saft business development manager.
POV: Power Breakfast

Power Breakfast for Mar. 21, 2016

Tesla discontinues 10 kWh Powerwall; Solar power plant using salt to produce electricity


POV: Power Breakfast

A nearly daily update of energy-related news:

  • Tesla has discontinued manufacturing the 10 kWh residential Powerwall home battery and has removed all references to it from its website. The battery was marketed as a backup power supply in the event that the grid should fail (like during Superstorm Sandy); however, the economics of this battery did not yield desired results. Instead, the company will focus on its 7 kWh Daily Powerwall.
  • A Californian company has created the first-of-its-kind solar power plant that stores electricity using salt. The power plant uses rings of billboard-sized mirrors to reflect the sun onto a salt filled tower. The molten salt boils the water which produces steam that powers electricity-generating turbines. The power plant is a 110 MW facility with 10 hours of energy storage (1,100 MWh of storage), enough to power 75,000 homes.