Celebrating an American Icon, the Majestic Bald Eagle

Protecting and preserving our nation’s symbol of freedom


Eagle at Big Brown Power Plant and Turlington Mine

Majestic eagle at Big Brown Power Plant and Turlington Mine

Legend has it that at least one of our founding fathers lobbied for the turkey to be considered our country’s national bird. While the turkey is indeed a special bird, for the past 234 years and counting, the bald eagle has been an American icon and proud symbol for the United States of America.

Each year, on June 20, we celebrate and honor the bald eagle, our national bird and national animal. It has become the most depicted bird in all of America, appearing in many government institutions and on official documents, including the one dollar bill, the president’s flag, the mace of the House of Representatives and military insignia. In real life, this majestic bird can be found throughout most of North America, including northern Mexico, Canada, Alaska and in our home state of Texas.

In fact, bald eagles have been spotted across numerous Luminant locations. On average, several mating pairs are identified at our facilities each year. Luminant works with the Texas Parks and Wildlife Department, the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service and the Texas Railroad Commission to protect bald eagles, their nests and their habitat. Bald eagle sightings by employees are documented, and detailed surveys for nests are conducted annually by members of Luminant’s environmental team.

Eagles sit on tree at Comanche Peak Nuclear Power Plant - Squaw Creek Park

Eagles sit on tree at Comanche Peak Nuclear Power Plant – Squaw Creek Park

“We’re respectful of the eagles and other wildlife that call our facilities and reclaimed land home. Throughout the year, we perform a range of activities to ensure that we do not disturb the eagles’ nests,” says Sid Stroud, Luminant environmental manager. “Over the years, we’ve seen an increase in their feeding activity at our plant’s water reservoirs. They truly are a majestic bird.”

For more than 40 years, Luminant has set the standard in land reclamation, restoring nearly 80,000 acres and planting more than 38 million trees. Luminant takes pride in developing environmental stewardship programs that will benefit Texas’ landscapes and wildlife for generations to come.

Did you know? In addition to bald eagles, a number of endangered, threatened and protected species, including the interior least tern, timber rattlesnake and an abundance of other wildlife benefit from Luminant’s restored mined lands and reservoirs.

 

More feathered highlights: See how Luminant helped Texas Parks and Wildlife Department’s Eastern wild turkey restoration effort take flight on more than 10,000 acres of reclaimed land in Rusk County.

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