Military veterans critical to filling growing demand for science, engineering jobs


CEO John Young encourages Fort Worth ISD Junior ROTC students to continue taking challenging math and science classes.

CEO John Young encourages Fort Worth ISD Junior ROTC students to continue taking challenging math and science classes.

The military develops strong leaders with highly specialized skills – often a natural fit to fill the ever-increasing demand for science, technology, engineering and mathematics (STEM) jobs, says Energy Future Holdings CEO John Young.

Maturity, integrity, quick decision making and respect for others are the types of behavior and traits developed in the military and STEM programs that make for great colleagues and leaders, Young recently told a group of 100 Fort Worth ISD Junior ROTC students.

Young was a guest speaker at the U.S. Naval Academy’s Remote STEM Day at the Perot Museum of Nature and Science in Dallas. A member of the Naval Academy Class of 1978 who went on to serve a tour as engineering officer on the guided missile cruiser USS Ticonderoga, Young said the military and STEM programs develop the discipline required to tackle difficult material, the analytical thinking needed to solve complex problems and the teamwork it takes to do great things.

Hands-on science experiments and engineering design activities shine a light on careers in science, technology, engineering and math.

Hands-on science experiments and engineering design activities shine a light on careers in science, technology, engineering and math.

The U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics predicts that more than 8 million new STEM jobs will be created in the U.S. by 2018. Texas ranks second among the states in projected need for STEM workers, expecting to fill more than 750,000 STEM jobs by 2018.

Young noted that military veterans currently play an essential role at EFH. In fact, veterans, guardsmen and reservists account for more than 15 percent of the employee base at Luminant alone. And EFH is privileged to help veterans in their career development through our membership in American Corporate Partners and our veterans mentoring program.

During their visit to the Perot Museum, the Junior ROTC students got hands-on with science experiments and engineering design activities, led by Naval Academy midshipmen and Perot Museum staff members, designed to shine a light on the many doors that a strong foundation in STEM can open, including careers in the military and energy industry.

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