Rare, bug-eating plants sprout environmental awareness at Dallas Arboretum


Only 15 counties in the state have pitcher plants, so for many Dallas Arboretum visitors this is a once-in-a-lifetime opportunity.

Only 15 counties in the state have pitcher plants, so for many Dallas Arboretum visitors this is a once-in-a-lifetime opportunity.

More than 100 rare carnivorous pitcher plants from Luminant’s Big Brown Turlington Mine near Fairfield have found a second life at the Dallas Arboretum and Botanical Gardens. The bug-eating plants, which were discovered by Luminant’s Environmental team and moved prior to new mining projects in the area, are helping plant the seed of environmental awareness and stewardship with future generations.

A tour of the plants in the Arboretum’s Woman’s Garden and Rory Meyers Children’s Adventure Garden recently attracted the interest of dozens of Energy Future Holdings employees, political action committee members and families, who turned out to see the pitcher plants and get a review of EFH environmental activities.

The carnivorous pitcher plants, which bloom in summer and fall, receive most of their nutrients from capturing and digesting insects.

The carnivorous pitcher plants, which bloom in summer and fall, receive most of their nutrients from capturing and digesting insects.

“Due to the scarcity of natural bog habitat where they can thrive, these unique plants are part of a statewide conservation effort,” said Sid Stroud, director of environmental mining. “Considering the mining activities scheduled for this area, we wanted to do everything possible to find these pitcher plants a permanent home.”

In addition to donating the rare plants, Luminant has planted more than 30 million trees since 1975 as part of the company’s reclamation program, has reduced air emissions by more than 20 percent from our coal-fuel levels since 2005 while increasing generation capacity by 2,200 megawatts, and has returned more than 99 percent of the large volumes of water used to cool plants to reservoirs for reuse, said Kim Mireles, Luminant’s vice president of environmental services, citing the latest Environmental Review.

Rep. Jason Villalba (R-114, Dallas), member of the House Environmental Regulation Committee, also was on hand to thank EFH and its employees for their commitment to environmental stewardship efforts across the state.

More Pov

 

TCEH Corp., Parent Company for Luminant and TXU Energy, Emerges from Chapter 11 as a Competitive, Well-Capitalized Company






News Release   TCEH Corp., Parent Company for Luminant and TXU Energy, Emerges from Chapter 11 as a Competitive, Well-Capitalized Company     *** Energy Industry Veteran Curt Morgan Formally Named CEO   *** Restructuring Eliminates More Than $33 Billion in Debt   *** Benefits from Low Leverage Relative to Peer Group   *** Company […]

Job One Profiles: Razen Thomas






Razen Thomas is proud to be Powering Texas and proud of the hard work and innovation that she sees from her colleagues every day at Oak Grove Power Plant. As support manager, Razen makes sure everyone has the tools, equipment and processes to do their jobs safely and effectively. Watch this month’s Job One Profile […]

A Soaring Success






An abundance of wildlife, including numerous bald eagles, call Luminant’s sites and reclaimed land home. When Liberty Mine’s resident bald eagle pair returns this fall, they’ll find a few home renovations – most notably, a new nest location. The eagles’ nest was recently moved away from mining activities to a new location on company property […]